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Sex Sells: The Cost of Freedom

human_trafficking_modern_Day_slavery_global_Fund_international_aid_opt (1) “Let’s talk about sex, baby. Let’s talk about you and me.” For those of you who are old enough to remember, this 1991 single by Salt-N-Pepa is about the positives and negatives of sex. Seriously though, let’s talk about it.  Did you know that each day women all around the world are exploited for sex and that many are taken from their homes and forced to sell themselves for sex? Women are not the only ones but even children, both girls and boys, are daily sold into slavery. Today this exploitation and form of slavery is called Human Trafficking, which is one of the greatest injustices in our world today. What is Human Trafficking? Human Trafficking is defined as organized criminal activity in which human beings are treated as possessions to be controlled and exploited (as by being forced into prostitution or involuntary labor). Today nearly “21 million people are victims of forced labor: 11.4 million women and girls and 9.5 million men and boys. Of those exploited by individuals or enterprises, 4.5 million are victims of forced sexual exploitation.” (International Labour Organization). The number of slaves today is nearly double the 12 million Africans that were taken by the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. (The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History). Today, Human Trafficking is the new Slave Trade of the modern age. According the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the city of Atlanta, GA ranks at one of the top 14 cities in the U.S. for children in prostitution. (Swecker, Chris. Federal Bureau of Investigation). In one article for the Dacula Patch by Deb Belt, Deb purposes that the city of Atlanta is the number one city for human trafficking, specifically for that of child trafficking. (Belt, Deb. Dacula Patch). Why? For starters Atlanta is home to the busiest airport in the world.  Additionally, interstate I85 connects Miami to New York.  Furthermore, the city is home to three professional athletic teams all of which causes tons of traffic in the city from all over the world. With all of the comings and goings within Atlanta how can human-trafficking be thwarted? In an interview with an Urban Plan and Design student from UMKC, he proposed from his studies that it is possible that city urban planners have the ability to be aware of every building within the city limits and knowledge of if it is used or not and what it is used for. Simply because trafficked slaves have to be held somewhere. On top of this he proposed that city urban planners are capable of finding out how many hotels have high reports of complaint; thus, allowing them to help law enforcement know what hotels need higher investigation. (Scoggan, Micah. Personal Interview) With this being said, why not push for a higher level of cooperation between city planning officials and law enforcement? Sure dealing with the building investigation is helpful, but that still does not deal with all of the traffic in Atlanta. Well ultimately security with airports, convention centers and athletic stadiums need to be enhanced. For example, more security cameras, security guards, and even more security check points can help flag suspicious suspects. Just like in the movie Taken where we see the trafficker targeting American girls outside of an airport regularly, with heightened security they should be able to flag him as a suspicious suspect who regularly is at airports yet never flies and is not a cab driver. Much like the hiring-on of more security, we should consider roach checks on major interstates like I85 in Atlanta. With more control on the comings and goings on the interstates through state patrol pulling suspicious vehicles over and potentially toll booths as well, the likely hood of trafficking women and children is dramatically decreased. However, the down side to this idea is the increase of traffic on the interstate which after the 2014 Snowpocalypse we might not want.  Thus, the city would have to create more public transportation to compensate the traffic jams, all of which creates a need for more money. This means more taxes. Plus who gets to determine which cars are suspicious and which are not? Just like how movie theaters have the video asking you to turn off all cell phones and business’ have their signs, why not include signs, posters, or videos warning you about human trafficking?  For example, since major sporting events are major hubs for human trafficking, such as the World Cup, Olympics, and Super Bowl which are the top three, why not before a game begins play a quick video saying something like the signs of trafficking awareness or something of that nature?  Additionally, right beside the “No Weapons Inside” sign why not include a number to call for trafficking awareness or a warning sign?  I guarantee if they see the video the traffickers’ targets will be more alert. On top of that, this is one of the cheapest methods one can use. Lastly, much like how we have Sex-Ed class in schools, now we should incorporate classes to warn kids about human trafficking and in parent teacher’s meetings talk to the parents about it. The more awareness we have in our city the more we can combat this injustice. This is yet another affordable method to deal with human trafficking. Most of these ideas may be costly; however, is the price for freedom ever not? Nevertheless, “the cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission” (Kennedy, John F. Cuban Soviet Missiles in Cuba Address). Therefore, let us remind ourselves that the fight for the freedom is costly. Thus, we must take on the attitude of the abolitionists of old- that even if the cost is high and even if the government asks for higher taxes, our efforts will be worth it in order to bring an end to human trafficking. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man. Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God’s work must truly be our own.” (Kennedy, John F. Inaugural Address).  Together we can see the end of Human Trafficking in the city of Atlanta, the U.S., and the world.     Works Cited

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